Introducing Our New Business Development Manager, Noelle Brown


We are pleased to announce that corporate housing specialist, Noelle Brown, has joined our PC Housing team as our Business Development Manager!

Noelle is a familiar name and face to many within the corporate housing industry. She is an experienced sales professional with more than 20 years of experience and knowledge in global mobility, relocation and contract negotiation. In her new role, Noelle will build strategic partnerships with organization leaders and effectively align and support key business initiatives while working towards improving the temporary housing experience for both temporary and transferee needs, and identify innovative and cost-effective solutions for PC Housing’s valued clients.

Noelle will represent PC Housing at the 2018 Worldwide ERC® Americas Mobility Conference (AMC) in Dallas, Texas, May 16 – 18. Recognized as the largest mobility meeting in the Americas, it brings together innovative corporate, government, and mobility leaders in the industry.

Prior to joining PC Housing, Noelle was most recently the Global Sales Representative for MyKey Global Accommodations and Senior National Account Manager for Oasis Corporate Housing. Noelle is a member of the Worldwide ERC, Corporate Housing Providers Association (CHPA), and the National Apartment Association (NAA).

When asked about her experience with our company, Noelle said, “I am happy and proud to have joined PC Housing, an industry leader within the temporary corporate housing industry. Guided and driven by PC Values, our service delivery model focuses on personalization and effectiveness so that guests are guaranteed a stress-free temporary living solution. PC Housing is a breath of fresh air for the corporate housing industry created by a dedicated, fun-loving positive corporate culture!”

“At PC Housing we seek out team members who are passionate about their career and those we serve. Noelle is truly committed to our by-line of ‘Delivering Personalized Housing Solutions with HEART,’ said PC Housing President Alex Shahabe. “Noelle is a consummate professional whose knowledge, drive, and enthusiasm parallel our goals for continued growth and expansion. We welcome Noelle to our family!”

 

3 Hottest Topics Within Employee Compensation


On a recent episode of HR Insider, we had the chance to sit down with Kimer Moore, owner of Capriccio HR. Capriccio is a human resources consulting firm that specializes in strategic HR and Total Rewards services and solutions for small and medium-sized organizations. Having spent much of her 19-year career in compensation, Kimer shared with us some of the hottest topics in compensation that she is seeing today.

 

Topic #1: Keeping Up With Legal Changes

There’s a lot going on in our country related to employee compensation, and helping companies stay on top of everything is more important than ever. One trending topic, of course, is the shifting legal landscape of benefits as dictated by the Affordable Care Act. Laws are changing, and companies must ensure they remain compliant.

In addition to the ACA, Kimer explains, “FLSA, which is your Fair Labor Standards Act, also has some legal changes that we’re trying to kind of keep on top of, making sure that people are compliant. But everything is bouncing back and forth. Do we do it? Do we not do it? So a big trend in compensation and benefits right now is just keeping an eye on what’s going on in the legal universe and making sure that the company is compliant with that.”

Topic #2: Equal Pay

The topic of equal treatment in the workplace has garnered more attention in the mainstream than ever before; this means that companies must ensure they aren’t in violation of any laws. Kimer says, “There is a lot going on around equal pay and equal rights. That’s another thing we’re trying to keep an eye on, making sure companies are paying people for the work that they do and not based on any other factor like gender. Some states have even started to implement rules stating that you cannot ask a candidate what their prior salary was at a company. You can only ask what they’re looking for.” Ultimately, companies need to take a step back and make sure they are paying every employee consistently with the market.


Topic #3: Total Compensation Packages

The last hot topic Kimer shared with us is the importance of the total compensation packages, beyond base salary. While potential and current employees alike often get caught up in the salary alone, it is important for employers to communicate the total value of the entire package. Kimer adds, “I think somewhere a company could get a little bit more bang for its buck, if you will, is offering good benefits packages to the employees in order to attract and retain people. When you give employees good benefits at your company, those are things that make it harder to leave because they’ve become used to the comfort of those benefits, and other companies may not necessarily have it as good. So benefits are another option for companies to attract talent and add value.”

While compensation is certainly not a new topic, it is an ever-evolving one. There are always new laws and policies being put in place and it is important for companies to be aware of these.

5 Myths About Millennials in the Workplace

On a recent episode of HR Insider, we had the chance to talk with Mary Larocca, Vice President of Global Business Development at Cornerstone Relocation Group. She debunked five common myths about millennials and shared insight into how best to approach this generation from an HR and Relocation perspective.

Myth #1: All Millennials Are Alike

A big mistake companies make is overlooking the individual needs of millennial employees because they assume certain likes and dislikes about their generation. “Everyone is unique and everybody has different things that contribute to who they are,” says Mary. “So try to find what’s individual about the person and what’s going to make things important for them. I think that’s a big thing that can be done even from the recruiting stage over to the HR stage.”

A great way to avoid the pitfall of generalizing the wants of a generation is to acknowledge people’s different needs by offering choices to your employees. It is unrealistic to individualize each policy, but your company can offer a set of options that employees can choose from. This is especially important when it comes to relocation. Mary suggests, “Give someone three or four choices that your company is okay with providing, then whoever is making the choice will feel like they’re invested in [what they have chosen] … Remember that somebody might want to just pack themselves up and move and one might want to have an option to use that money towards pet sitting or some other thing.” Millennials are not a “one size fits all” generation. Acknowledge the individual needs of your employees by offering options.

 

Myth #2: Millennials Have Social Interaction Issues

A big stereotype about millennials is that they are more comfortable with sitting behind a computer and chatting online than they are with talking on the phone or face-to-face. While it is true that the former is a more common way for millennials to communicate, it doesn’t mean they are anti-social. The fact that this generation communicates and shares their interests online can be a real asset to HR professionals because it can give them insight into what their employees like and need.

Mary recommends using the internet to HR’s advantage with a little online research to help form connections between employees. Identify some of your employees’ interests by searching online and find a way to bridge those interests with team building activities. She says, “When you’re having a relocation program, maybe think about things like shared housing or doing social outings that have a purpose. We recently, here in Arizona, went out to a food bank and handled giving out food to people who needed it in the Phoenix community. Things like that help people feel connected and make our world feel a little smaller.” Though it may seem like millennials prefer to stay behind their computer screen, they still need connection and purpose. Motivate them with meaningful causes and opportunities to spend time with their team.

Myth #3: Millennials Have No Loyalty

The millennial generation has gained a reputation of having no loyalty because it is much more common for them to work at multiple companies throughout their career compared to previous generations. While it is true that changing employers is much more common for millennials, this doesn’t necessarily mean that there is a lack of loyalty. Mary points out that millennials have loyalty to themselves. “Being loyal to yourself, to the process, and making yourself happy is much different than loyalty to a big company or a manager,” she explains. This commonality among millennials is beneficial for companies to know. Mary says, “From an HR perspective, think about what’s important to the person that you are managing or the person that you’re bringing on.” By listening to what your employee wants, you will know how to keep them at your company.

Therefore, it is more about companies adapting to a generation that has different desires and wants to be loyal to themselves. In knowing this, companies can retain millennials by allowing them opportunities to do something that they love. Mary points out how critical it is for the HR community to ask each person on their team or each person that they are moving what’s important to them. She says, “Sometimes [managers] just don’t want to ask the question and I think they’re missing out on an opportunity to really make someone feel loyal and connected, and [millenials] do that by being passionate about things.”

 

Myth 4: Millennials Can’t Take Ownership

A common trait in millennials is that they are about a shared economy. Mary points out that “[Millennials] want to have things, but only when it makes sense. [They] don’t want to spend hundreds of dollars on a purse, for example, when [they] can rent one and just use it for the season or an afternoon.” There is a shift in the mindset of ownership in which millennials want to use objects when needed and let others enjoy their use when they are not needed, rather than just sitting unused.

To expand upon this myth, Mary highlights how experiences are more valuable to millennials than accumulating material goods. From an HR perspective, she suggests, “Think about the experience you can give an employee… Is there an experience that you can give that employee that might make them be able to stay with the company longer? Is there an assignment overseas that they could go for three months because they don’t have all the things that can tie them back home in the U.S.?” Use the new perspective on ownership to help motivate your millennial employees by providing them with the option to collect new experiences through your company.

Myth #5: Millenials Can’t Make Decisions

The myth that millennials are indecisive has evolved from the ability to research and comparison shop. Millennials make decisions, but they tend to research ahead of time online before making those decisions. The common practice of online research is an important factor for businesses to consider when recruiting millennials. Mary suggests, “Research yourself and see what impression you are giving…  If you’re trying to portray something, make sure that’s really what’s coming across from a technology standpoint because that’s where everyone’s going to go first to look.” Having the insight that millennials do make decisions, but they shop around first, will help ensure that your online presence is properly representing your business and attracting your desired candidates.

When it comes to stereotypes about generations, it’s helpful to have an idea of what to expect and how to handle interactions; yet, in the end, we are talking about individual human beings, and no one person is the same. Mary sums it up perfectly when she says, “You really can find real connections and real loyalty when you find out what’s important to a person and what makes them an individual.”

 

3 HR Trends to Watch


Recently, we sat down with Dr. Stevie Dawn, the owner and founder of Orange Compass, who works with human resources departments across the country implementing emotional intelligence-based training. She shed some light on three of the most talked-about topics in HR today: Talent acquisition, millennials in the workplace, and succession training.

 

Talent Acquisition

Dr. Dawn:  “At this point, companies can’t afford to make [hiring] mistakes anymore. They have to hire the right people at the right time and that means having people who are specialists in that talent field, so I think [we’re] seeing a lot of HR professionals start to divide into regular, strategic, tactical HR, and talent acquisition. It’s a different mode. You have to be able to read people differently and look at different assessment tools and things like that in the talent field. One of the biggest hot-button issues right now is just finding good talent.”

Dr. Dawn makes a great point: hiring people is much more difficult today than it was 20 years ago. You are looking for talented people that will be a good fit for your organization, and finding the right person means looking at all the individual pieces and putting them together.

 

Millennials in the Workplace

Dr. Dawn:There are millennials coming through the ranks that have the skill set, as far as they’ve got the knowledge. They’ve gone to college. We’re making college something more and more people can do, which is awesome. So more and more people are getting a college education and they have those skill sets, but they’re not getting any work experience along the way, which then falls to HR because once they’re hired, who has to train them? The HR department is now having to do more on the job training than they’ve ever had to do before, especially in things like soft skills and how to be a good employee. If they’ve never had a job, they’ve never learned that skill.”

Millennials in the workplace is certainly a hot topic today, and they are entering the workforce in droves. Companies are being forced to adjust to these new employees who are more different from their predecessors than any other generation before them. Empowering millennials with soft skills training is an excellent way to bridge the gap.


 

Succession Training

Dr. Dawn:What we’re seeing is a lot of the top level executives at companies are leaving and moving on to another stage of their life and therefore, there are openings at the top but we don’t have a lot of people trained within to handle those kinds of positions. We’ve trained them to do very specific jobs, but we have not trained them to have strategic vision. We have not trained them in critical thinking. And so, can they really manage a huge organization if they’ve only ever managed their one department of 10 people? As organizations, we’ve got to start thinking about succession planning.”

Unprepared successors are an issue businesses have begun to run into as executives retire. To bypass this problem, Dr. Dawn points out that companies need to train the upcoming generation to lead at a larger scale. Empowering employees with a strategic and big picture skill set will make for a much more effective transition to leadership down the line.

To hear Dr. Stevie Dawn’s entire interview and more bits of wisdom, you can listen here.

 

What to Consider When Hiring Someone With a Conviction

We sat down with Lee, an HR Director at one of the nation’s leading homeless services providers, to talk about his work in the nonprofit sector. He specifically works with hiring employees who have convictions on their records. While this is a group that typically struggles to find employment, Lee doesn’t shy away from investing in these employees and shared with us some of his experience and advice.

Lee has a passion for second chances and has changed lives due to his heart and drive. While a lot of organizations don’t even consider applicants with a felony conviction, Lee looks at each situation individually and uses many different qualifiers to determine if someone will be a good fit, regardless of their past.

“We’ll take a look at the conviction, we’ll use the [individualized assessment of criminal history] on how long it has been and consider what the felony was, what the conviction was, how long since they served time, and what their behavior has been since they came out. You can get a very passionate employee when you give somebody a chance that nobody else is willing to give them.”

He also offers advice for HR representatives looking to follow in his footsteps:

“The very first thing you have to do is take a critical assessment of the job and the job description. Once you’ve made a critical assessment of what the job looks like, what the exposures that they’re going to have are, what crimes probably do not fit with the job, you do your background investigation and take a look at the individual.”

Lee employs a very holistic approach; in addition to looking at if the crime will be a conflict with the potential job, he looks at the time that has elapsed since the conviction and whether several crimes have been committed in the past several years.

“You can get a very passionate employee when you give somebody a chance that nobody else is willing to give them.”

It is important to distinguish if past criminal activity is indicative of a pattern or if it was a one-time thing. He also makes sure to differentiate between a conviction and an arrest:

“What is the conviction? Was it truly a conviction? Or was it just an arrest? If it’s an arrest, you know, lots of people have had false accusations made against them. Look for the conviction. If it was one to three years ago, I probably would say that’s a red flag. If it’s three to seven years ago, then you might want to take a very serious look at it. Ask them to take a look at their environment since the fulfillment of whatever obligation they had. If it’s more than seven to ten years ago, why are we even talking about it? Unless it’s a directly related crime, what you are you being exposed to?”

Lee puts his belief that change is possible for an individual into action, and he has seen firsthand how much of an impact these second chances can have on one’s life. We asked him to leave us with one piece of advice, the best advice he has heard throughout his career, and it seemed to encompass his perspective nicely.

“Just don’t make any rash decisions. Consider all the possible ramifications of whatever decision you’re going to make, and make the best choice. But you can’t do that if you’re going to do it in haste.”

If you know what to look for, giving someone a second chance doesn’t have to be a huge risk. You might even get to change a life.

How To Strike the Perfect Balance Between Work and Life

business and leisure

 Sometimes it feels like technology has extended the 9-5 workday to a 24-hour workday. With a smartphone, you have the office in your pocket at all times. Because of this, it can be very tempting to answer emails at midnight or phone calls on the weekend, but these habits will drain you very quickly. The Corporate Executive Board found that employees that maintained a healthy work-life balance were 21% more productive than those who didn’t. While it may feel like you must be on-call 24/7 because everyone else is doing it, letting work take over your life can actually hurt your performance in the long run.

Establish Boundaries Early On
Nobody is going to be able to maintain your work-life balance but you. This is the most important thing to realize and accept when you set off to strike a healthy balance between your work and your personal life. Once you understand that, you will be able to establish boundaries that work for you. Talk to your boss or manager and set expectations with them early on. This should be done as soon as possible because once you start staying at the office late into the night or answering emails on the weekend, people will come to expect that from you. Setting these boundaries will help manage expectations and allow you to avoid uncomfortable conversations later on.

Take a Break When Needed
Everyone needs a break at one point or another. It’s easy to fall into the mindset that your work is too important to take a break from, but no job is more important than your own well-being. Whether it’s leaving your desk to take a short walk or planning a relaxing vacation, a break from your work can be exactly what you need to improve your performance. Employers understand that their workers are not machines and sometimes need to rest. In fact, 91% of senior business leaders believe workers return from vacations ready to work more efficiently. If you feel yourself burning out, talk to your boss about stepping away for a bit.

Make Deliberate Choices
Unfortunately, work-life balance won’t just happen. You need to make it happen, and that can be done by being deliberate in everything you do. Nobody chooses to let their work take over their life; it is usually the result of letting things slowly slide until it has become unmanageable. This can be avoided by making conscious choices and talking to the important people in your life to see what is or isn’t working. This may not be easy; it is something that you must be constantly monitoring. Come up with a plan of what is important to you, what you want to accomplish, and how you will do it. By making sure every choice you makes aligns with this plan, you will be able to strike a healthy work-life balance.

Without a doubt, it is important to work hard and be successful in your professional life. But it is also important to prioritize your personal life sometimes, and that is equally important to your happiness. A healthy work-life balance is also imperative to your professional success because you’ll find yourself overwhelmed and burned out if you focus on work 24/7. Ultimately, you’ll benefit much more by establishing a good balance.

4 Red Flags When Choosing a Place To Stay

Applying for job on internet, work searching

 

Searching for a new corporate housing partner can be an intimidating process. There are so many options, and you don’t want to choose the wrong one. When it comes time to decide who you’ll trust to handle your corporate housing, here are four red flags you’ll want to watch out for.

Difficult or Unresponsive Staff
A staff that is difficult to communicate with during the search or booking process is probably one of the most obvious red flags. If they can’t be bothered to respond to your emails or phone calls at the beginning of the process, there is very little hope that they would be responsive if an issue arose during your employee’s stay. A corporate housing company should be a partner to you and work to make your job easier, not more difficult. If you start having trouble interacting with a company representative immediately, you should probably find a new corporate housing partner. You should always expect outstanding communication, but especially at the onset; this is when a company should be trying to impress you and convince you to work with them. If someone isn’t actively trying to win your business, then why would you award it to them?

Significantly Less Expensive Than Comparable Apartments
At first, this may seem counterintuitive; who can pass up a great deal? But as the saying goes, ‘If it looks too good to be true, it probably is.’ Look beyond the attractively low price tag and consider why someone would be offering an apartment at a price much lower than comparable apartments in the area. More likely than not, there is a problem that the landlord or company is not telling you about, and they may be trying to offload the unit as quickly as possible.

Lack Of Ability To Accommodate You
If your corporate housing partner is unable to provide housing in the places that you need, you should find a company that can. You want to find someone that can grow with your company; this means a company that can provide housing options in cities across the country, not just in your area.

Unwilling or Unable to Provide References
One of the biggest indicators of how a company will perform is how they have done in the past. Before deciding on a corporate housing partner, you’ll want to read reviews or testimonials from companies that have worked with them in the past. Many companies have a section on their website dedicated to testimonials; if these are not readily available on their website, you should ask a representative. If they cannot give you any reviews, references, or documents of recommendation, this is cause for concern and you should ask yourself why they do not have any happy customers willing to share their experience.

By avoiding companies with any of these red flags, you can feel confident that your corporate housing partner will make your job easier while also ensuring your employees have a satisfactory stay.

Top 3 Dishes that Offer the Best of Traditional San Diego Food!

Favorite San Diego Food : Fish Tacos

San Diego is a multicultural, ethnically diverse metropolis, which means that the food is as unique as the people who make it. This sunny city by the sea offers a delicious sampling of everything, but there are a few signature dishes that embody “San Diego food.” Here are the three best San Diego signature dishes and where to find them:

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Hotel vs. Temporary Housing: What You Should Know Before You Choose Your Home Away from Home

Temporary Housing apartment package complete living room, fully-stocked kitchen, and modern dining room.

Looking for a place to stay means evaluating your needs and preferences. It can also mean sacrificing comfort and convenience, for the sake of having a reasonable place to stay that meets your needs at a specific time. You’ve worked to make sure your home is perfectly suited for you in style, layout, furnishings, comfort, and more. That’s why there’s no place like home.

Having to find a place to stay for business, relocation, or vacation purposes that meets your immediate needs doesn’t mean having to forego comfort and convenience. It is possible to get the convenience of a hotel stay with the comfort and independence of your home.

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Best in Brew: The 5 Top Coffee Houses in Seattle

Crowded Coffee House

You’ve tasted the coffee of Seattle-born Starbucks, which can now be found on practically every street corner in the U.S. But next time you’re in Seattle, a bona fide coffee-lover’s paradise, try a taste of lesser-known caffeinated splendor — you won’t regret it. And we’ll make it easy for you; here’s a list of the best coffee houses in Seattle:

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